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Viewing entries posted in March 2015

Aufgrund des Datenschutzgesetzes John Edwards
30 March 2015

germanwings

The rush to judgment in the Germanwings air crash tragedy is unseemly and precipitous, but entirely predictable and understandable.

Using alternative dispute resolution in privacy Joanna Hayward
27 March 2015

privacy geek

Resolving privacy complaints is one of the most important things we do as an office. Last year, we received 725 complaints and 2015 is not slowing down.

X + Y JLB
26 March 2015

Commodore pocket calculator edit

Use our new response calculator to work out the latest date by when an organisation must respond to you if you make a request to access or correct your personal information. This is usually 20 working days after the request is received by them.

Complaints blitz Charles Mabbett
24 March 2015

complaints edit

We’re transforming our complaints process. We want it to be faster and more flexible with better outcomes for complainants and respondents. It is the reason we have embarked on an office wide ‘complaints blitz’.

Getting to know Asia’s data privacy laws Blair Stewart
13 March 2015

asia map

In our inter-connected world, legal advisers to businesses that operate online are increasingly expected to know or be able to find out something about other countries’ privacy laws. Asia is one of the world’s most significant economic regions and it is important to understand how the data protection and privacy environments of Asian countries work.

American takeaways John Edwards
10 March 2015

white house edit

This is not a post about hot-dogs, pretzels, fries or pizza. What we call “takeaways”, Americans refer to as “take-out”, or simply as “fast food”. That’s why there’s no confusion in the US when the handbook for the International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP) Global Privacy Summit explains what a participant can expect to “take away” from each session.

A breach, a complaint and how we helped John Edwards
9 March 2015

complaint edit

Late last year, one of my senior investigating officers came to me with a file she’d been working on for quite a while. She was convinced the facts supported a finding of an “interference with privacy”, that is, a breach of the privacy principles, that had caused harm to the complainant. She’d tried to reach a settlement, but the parties were too far apart.

The Washington post John Edwards
4 March 2015

washington edit

I’m in Washington DC to talk privacy, or data privacy, or data protection, or however else this growing international preoccupation is described in different jurisdictions, sectors and economies.