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Viewing entries posted in April 2015

Get it done online JLB
29 April 2015

help 2

If you have a complaint about a breach of your privacy, you can now lodge it online with us. “Making privacy easy” is what we try to do and it has become something of a motto for us. We want to make it as easy as possible for you to get the information you need, and for you to engage with us when you need to. Our online complaint form is intended to do just that.

Guest post: Taking personal information seriously Russell Burnard - Government Chief Privacy Officer
20 April 2015

I trust organisations that share safely small

Every day New Zealanders hand over their personal information to government departments in exchange for a range of services, from benefits to drivers’ licences. From the citizen’s perspective, these transactions are based on trust that their information will be handled safely and securely.

Putting children first Richard Stephen
15 April 2015

children

As a parent or guardian of a child under 16, you are entitled to request health information about your child as if it were your own information. For other personal information, the Privacy Act does not provide a right of access by a parent, but a parent or guardian can request information if the child is either too young to act on their own behalf, or where the child has consented.

Join us and make a difference JLB
8 April 2015

job edit

Come join us as we transform the way we work to “make privacy easy”. That’s our Privacy Commissioner’s mantra and our mandate and we’re currently recruiting for four positions (the deadline is 20 April).

AISA does it John Edwards
7 April 2015

keep calm and use an aisa 2

The case for government agencies identifying opportunities to work together to provide public services is compelling. We expect government to be efficient, to deliver services based on sound reasoning and in ways that bring the most benefit to the people they are trying to help.

Guest post: Many questions, some answers Richard Foy - DIA General Manager of Digital Transformation
2 April 2015

passport

Everyone knows the old adage about how on the internet no one knows you’re a dog. As we move government towards more digital, we’re less concerned about whether you’re a dog, but more concerned about which dog you are, and how can we make sure we’re providing you the right services.