Our website uses cookies to give you the best experience and for us to analyse our site usage. If you continue to use our site, we will take it you are OK about this. Click on More for information about the cookies on our site and what you can do to opt out.

We respect your Do Not Track preference.

Guest post: Many questions, some answers Richard Foy - DIA General Manager of Digital Transformation
2 April 2015

passport

Everyone knows the old adage about how on the internet no one knows you’re a dog. As we move government towards more digital, we’re less concerned about whether you’re a dog, but more concerned about which dog you are, and how can we make sure we’re providing you the right services.

There’s an interesting convergence around the need to identify people but also for people to maintain anonymity and sense of privacy when online. That’s where the Identity Conference comes in, tackling this modern day conundrum:

“How then can we maximise the benefits and minimise the risks around identity and privacy in our increasingly digitised and connected ways of living, working, socialising, shopping, and playing?”

For me, it’s about getting the conversation right about identity in a digital world, balanced with the concerns and challenges of respecting people’s privacy.

In my role as the General Manager of Digital Transformation at the Department of Internal Affairs, I’ll be presenting on the subject of service transformation. No doubt I’ll explain why we think RealMe is vital to this transformation and how it can play the role of a key, a passport and a curtain when it comes to proving and protecting your identity online.

But I’m also there to listen. In government, it can be very easy for us to think narrowly based on what we want to achieve but it’s important to get broad and open dialogue going.

The Identity Conference provides the ideal platform to bring together world-leading global and local thinkers. There will be academics and researchers there, as well as the ‘digirati’ and government.

I’m personally looking forward to have my mind expanded by being around all the smart thinkers in this space, and I’ll be doing my best to also contribute to the discourse. I intend to be there for the full two days to soak up all I can. I’d love it if you came to talk to me about transformation of government digitally. There’s a lot to do!

Richard Foy is the General Manager of Digital Transformation at the Department of Internal Affairs. He wrote this guest post for us to highlight what he hopes to get out of the Identity Conference on 18-19 May 2015. For more information about the Identity Conference, visit the conference website or the conference page on our website.

1 comments

Back

Comments

  • My concerns about identity are those of "Mistaken identity". How is Joe Bloggs of Northland not Joe Bloggs of Southland?
    Personally I would like to see a "social Security system", a number system where the uniqueness is accessible by all parties & institutions 'needing to know'. The private sector has no problem with shared resources of identities of individuals, yet 'Big Brother', an entity encouraged and designed to look after our best interests & welfare does not have the freedom that private enterprise has.
    It is too easy for you & me to provide false information and skip away to South America or get a driver’s license where none of the institutions is allowed to cross reference information. The driver’s license is a key verifier of identity. We need something more universal, less open to abuse.
    Another example :- this country is full of really old people not dead and dead people not born. A perusal of the Registrar's records (BMD) will easily make that obvious.
    If we need to identify a person, it should be done fully, consistently among institutions. If they do not use a single source (RealMe) then the process & procedures should be identical to produce an identical, but duplicate data set. Otherwise, bother not that the police & courts will imprison incorrectly a non-existent person while his real persona can safely flee the country. I just love this story of incompetence of processes.
    Regards. Barry P.

    Posted by Barry E. PYCROFT, 12/05/2015 6:16pm (3 years ago)

    Post Reply

    The aim of the Office of Privacy Commissioner’s blog is to provide a space for people to interact with the content posted. We reserve the right to moderate all comments. We will not publish any content that is abusive, defamatory or is obviously commercial. We ask for your email address so that we can contact you if necessary to clarify your comment. Please be respectful of authors and others leaving comments.

Post your comment

The aim of the Office of Privacy Commissioner’s blog is to provide a space for people to interact with the content posted. We reserve the right to moderate all comments. We will not publish any content that is abusive, defamatory or is obviously commercial. We ask for your email address so that we can contact you if necessary to clarify your comment. Please be respectful of authors and others leaving comments.

Latest Blog Entries