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Viewing entries tagged with 'HRRT'

Tribunal finds confusion over request led to delay Annabel Fordham
14 June 2017

Flickr The U.S. Army Taekwondo champion

Mr Brooks was an active Taekwondo competitor and a long-time member of the Taekwondo Union of New Zealand (TUNZ). He represented New Zealand in the 2005 World Championships and the 2006 Commonwealth Championships.

How to say sorry Lynley Cahill
13 February 2017

sorry

Here at the Office of the Privacy Commissioner, we have a statutory duty to use our best endeavours to resolve complaints. Many complaints are resolved when the respondent agency simply apologises to the complainant.

Tribunal awards partial costs to Police in privacy case Charles Mabbett
31 January 2017

costs

You can act for yourself in the Human Rights Review Tribunal but the way you conduct your case could lead to you having to pay the costs of the other side.

Tribunal dismisses costs application despite litigant's conduct Charles Mabbett
8 December 2016

Voltaire

“I was never ruined but twice: once when I lost a lawsuit, and once when I won one.” Voltaire’s words encapsulate the sharp reality that it can cost a lot of money for cases to be heard and decided in a court of law – even if you are the successful party. A recent Human Rights Review Tribunal case, for example, cost ACC just over $33,000.

Employee browsing is a no-no Abigail Vink
25 November 2016

employee browsing

Have you ever been tempted to search your company’s database for information about your colleagues’ pay, promotions, employment disputes or performance?  Or perhaps you have access to client databases which contain juicy information about customers’ purchase history and financial situation? Humans are inherently curious beings, but be aware that browsing other people’s private information is against the law.

Woman says Police unfairly disclosed information to her employer Charles Mabbett
2 November 2016

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As a result of a complaint, Police began an investigation into a woman who worked at a district health board. The complaint alleged that she may have accessed DHB health records in order to locate children who had been the victims of crimes committed by her brother.