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Viewing entries tagged with 'Human Rights Review Tribunal'

A sincere apology is hard to beat Charles Mabbett
12 September 2017

Odysseus

It is said that a sincere apology should include the three Rs – regret, responsibility and remedy. Why apologise and how to do it properly is a subject we’ve discussed before. But we continue to see apologies that fail to convince a complainant. So it’s something we thought we’d revisit in this post because the quality of an apology is an important part of our efforts to resolve privacy complaints.

Williams v ACC: Getting the information right Jane Foster
25 July 2017

goldfinch

A recent Human Rights Review Tribunal decision has highlighted the importance of agencies complying with privacy principle 8 (the accuracy principle) and ensuring they take reasonable steps to ensure the information is accurate and up-to-date before they use it.

Should agencies leave no stone unturned? Charles Mabbett
10 May 2017

pebbles 796943 960 720

Organisations sometimes get it wrong when they respond to a person’s request for their personal information. Information is sometimes lost, displaced or accidentally deleted. A recent privacy case dealt with by the Human Rights Review Tribunal considers when an organisation can call it quits when it comes to searching for personal information in responding to an access request.

How to say sorry Lynley Cahill
13 February 2017

sorry

Here at the Office of the Privacy Commissioner, we have a statutory duty to use our best endeavours to resolve complaints. Many complaints are resolved when the respondent agency simply apologises to the complainant.

Tribunal awards partial costs to Police in privacy case Charles Mabbett
31 January 2017

costs

You can act for yourself in the Human Rights Review Tribunal but the way you conduct your case could lead to you having to pay the costs of the other side.

Tribunal dismisses costs application despite litigant's conduct Charles Mabbett
8 December 2016

Voltaire

“I was never ruined but twice: once when I lost a lawsuit, and once when I won one.” Voltaire’s words encapsulate the sharp reality that it can cost a lot of money for cases to be heard and decided in a court of law – even if you are the successful party. A recent Human Rights Review Tribunal case, for example, cost ACC just over $33,000.

Employee browsing is a no-no Abigail Vink
25 November 2016

employee browsing

Have you ever been tempted to search your company’s database for information about your colleagues’ pay, promotions, employment disputes or performance?  Or perhaps you have access to client databases which contain juicy information about customers’ purchase history and financial situation? Humans are inherently curious beings, but be aware that browsing other people’s private information is against the law.

ACC withheld information from chiropractor about investigation Charles Mabbett
4 October 2016

ACC

A chiropractor being investigated by ACC made numerous requests for information about the investigation. When ACC withheld some of the information, he complained to the Privacy Commissioner, and then took his case to the Human Rights Review Tribunal.