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Viewing entries tagged with 'HIPC'

Can I tell the cops? A guide for health professionals Richard Stephen
7 July 2017

Doctor examining a patient2

In their job, health professionals have to look after some of the most intimate details of their patients’ lives. This is a great responsibility, and patients trust and expect doctors, nurses and others to not just tell anyone. This obligation is recognised in the Health Information Privacy Code.

Traitors under our skin? Sebastian Morgan-Lynch
4 April 2017

1044px Diagram of the human heart hu svg

When Ross Compton’s house caught fire in September 2016, he was able to escape unscathed, with a suitcase full of clothes and the charger for his external heart pump. But when the 59-year-old US man explained to arson investigators how he’d broken the window with his cane and hurled his most important belongings out the window before scrambling to safety, they weren’t convinced. And so, in a twist that would have been science fictional a few years ago, they interrogated his heart.  

Parents' right to know: Children's right to privacy Charles Mabbett
8 July 2016

teenagers

As parents, we expect to be told everything about our infants when we take them to the doctor. The same with our toddlers. By the time they get to their teens, it gets a little more complicated. Should parents have the right to know about all about their under 16-year-old’s healthcare?

Health info: The right to know made easy Marilyn Andrew
31 May 2016

Dont Hide Your Shame Paul Holmes

Mrs Patel was outraged. She’d visited her GP for a follow-up check after her hand surgery, and he’d asked her about her history of depression. She didn’t think she’d had anything of the sort, and decided to ask the receptionist for a copy of all her medical notes to see what else was in there. The young receptionist assured her that the doctor owned the notes so she couldn’t have them. 

Secure email for health information Sebastian Morgan-Lynch
19 April 2016

email

Fast, accurate and complete information flows in the health sector are vital for all of us. If your doctor doesn’t have a particular test result, prescription or diagnosis, it might endanger your safety or even your life. Because of this, medical communication systems have tended to prioritise simplicity and speed over innovation and security. 

The value of a phone call Hayley Forrest
12 January 2016

Phone image

Digital communication is ubiquitous: a hair salon sends you text messages reminding you of appointments; movie tickets are booked through apps on your phone – and you wave a card in the air to pay for groceries. Our expectations might be that our health records can be also be swiftly and easily transferred.

Dealing effectively with online cries for help Octavia Palmer
20 July 2015

traffic sign 6729

“A lot of you cared, just not enough” - Jay Asher, Thirteen Reasons Why. Hannah, the subject of Jay Asher’s young-adult novel, commits suicide. Before she killed herself, she left an anonymous note for her teacher saying she was considering suicide. As the note was anonymous, the faculty did not take it seriously.

Managing disclosure when faced with closure Charles Mabbett
29 May 2015

RA 2

What happens to personal information when an organisation closes down? One thing is certain. Don’t follow the example of a doctor who, when closing his surgery to retire, attempted to bury his patient notes on a beach. The tides and the wind had other plans and scattered the files along the beach for all to see.