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Viewing entries tagged with 'principle 11'

Reducing harm from family violence Becci Whitton
10 October 2016

do no harm

As you may have seen in the news over the last couple of weeks, the Government has announced broad reforms of the Domestic Violence Act 1995, aimed at reducing the harm from New Zealand’s appalling rates of family violence.

Fancy Bears hack shows spear phishing threat Charles Mabbett
7 October 2016

fancy bear2

Nobody likes their health information being made public. But for Olympic athletes, this has become an occupational hazard as allegations of cheating and the use of performance-enhancing drugs are exchanged between those found to be guilty and those who are clean.

Recording of phone calls at the doctor’s Charles Mabbett
20 September 2016

Stethoscope in use

We are often asked if an employer can record the phone conversations in their workplace. A recent case before the Human Rights Review Tribunal put this question in sharp relief recently and serves as a good guide for employers. The answer is yes, but as you’ll see, conditions do apply.

Blind transparency Neil Sanson
13 September 2016

WikileaksFlag

If you have other people’s personal information, it is your responsibility to keep it safe. There are many reasons why you need to keep that information secure. Here’s one recent example of how careless disclosure can put people at risk.

Can I make an anonymous privacy complaint? Riki Jamieson-Smyth
29 August 2016

anonymous

People have been asking us recently: “If I make a complaint- can I stay anonymous? Can’t the Privacy Commissioner step into my shoes and keep my identity secret and out of the action? Does the agency or person need to know I’ve complained about them at all?” The answer is that they probably do need to know who you are and exactly what you’ve complained about. The reason is natural justice. 

Tribunal dismisses $100,000 damages claim Charles Mabbett
18 September 2015

bank

A complainant seeking $100,000 in damages for Westpac’s disclosure of a debit card statement to his employer has had his case dismissed by the Human Rights Review Tribunal.

$18,000 damages for disclosing private letter Charles Mabbett
6 August 2015

letter

The Human Rights Review Tribunal says a former Massey University extramural student society president suffered humiliation and significant injury to her feelings after a private letter addressed to her was leaked to a student magazine.

Aufgrund des Datenschutzgesetzes John Edwards
30 March 2015

germanwings

The rush to judgment in the Germanwings air crash tragedy is unseemly and precipitous, but entirely predictable and understandable.