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Viewing entries tagged with 'principle 11'

To come with clean hands Charles Mabbett
29 September 2017

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When we use the metaphor ‘to come with clean hands’, it means to have done nothing underhand or illegal. It’s a term that applies in the context of resolving privacy disputes. There’s a general expectation that if you make a complaint to our office, you did not bring the breach of privacy upon yourself through your actions.

Can I tell the cops? A guide for health professionals Richard Stephen
7 July 2017

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In their job, health professionals have to look after some of the most intimate details of their patients’ lives. This is a great responsibility, and patients trust and expect doctors, nurses and others to not just tell anyone. This obligation is recognised in the Health Information Privacy Code.

What do I do if I think a child is at risk? Sam Grover
6 July 2017

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If you think a child is at risk, can you tell someone? This video spells out the answer to this question: yes. If you think a child is at risk, tell a police officer, social worker or someone else who can help. You won’t get into trouble.

Reducing harm from family violence Becci Whitton
10 October 2016

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As you may have seen in the news over the last couple of weeks, the Government has announced broad reforms of the Domestic Violence Act 1995, aimed at reducing the harm from New Zealand’s appalling rates of family violence.

Fancy Bears hack shows spear phishing threat Charles Mabbett
7 October 2016

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Nobody likes their health information being made public. But for Olympic athletes, this has become an occupational hazard as allegations of cheating and the use of performance-enhancing drugs are exchanged between those found to be guilty and those who are clean.

Recording of phone calls at the doctor’s Charles Mabbett
20 September 2016

Stethoscope in use

We are often asked if an employer can record the phone conversations in their workplace. A recent case before the Human Rights Review Tribunal put this question in sharp relief recently and serves as a good guide for employers. The answer is yes, but as you’ll see, conditions do apply.

Blind transparency Neil Sanson
13 September 2016

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If you have other people’s personal information, it is your responsibility to keep it safe. There are many reasons why you need to keep that information secure. Here’s one recent example of how careless disclosure can put people at risk.

Can I make an anonymous privacy complaint? Riki Jamieson-Smyth
29 August 2016

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People have been asking us recently: “If I make a complaint- can I stay anonymous? Can’t the Privacy Commissioner step into my shoes and keep my identity secret and out of the action? Does the agency or person need to know I’ve complained about them at all?” The answer is that they probably do need to know who you are and exactly what you’ve complained about. The reason is natural justice.