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Privacy Act & codes

Credit Reporting Privacy Code 2004

This page contains the current version of the Credit Reporting Privacy Code and copies of the amendments to the code. If you're interested, you can also find background information on the amendments below.

The current code

 

Credit Reporting Privacy Code Amendment No. 10

The Privacy Commissioner has issued the Credit Reporting Privacy Code Amendment No. 10.

The amendment aligns the Credit Reporting Privacy Code 2004 with statutory amendments made to related legislation.  The amendment came into force on 5 November 2015.
 

Credit Reporting Privacy Code Amendment No. 9

Under the Credit Reporting Privacy Code 2004, individuals are entitled to have access to credit information held by credit reporters. Access is to be given free of charge unless the individual concerned requests that the information be made available within five working days in which case a  ‘reasonable charge’ may be made. 

The Privacy Commissioner has issued the Credit Reporting Privacy Code Amendment No. 9 to set the maximum amount a credit reporter may charge for making credit information available quickly to the individual concerned. The amendment:

  • sets the maximum amount a credit reporter may charge at $10; and
  • requires credit reporters to make this charging limit clear to individuals on their websites.

View:

The amendment follows the recent publication by the Commissioner of a report on an inquiry into the charging practices of a major credit reporter. For background, see ‘Report into Veda Advantage’s charge for urgent requests for personal information’.

The amendment comes into force on 24 July 2014. View the submissions received during the code consultation process:

 

Credit Reporting Privacy Code Amendment No. 8

The Privacy Commissioner has issued Amendment No.8 to the Credit Reporting Privacy Code 2004. The amendment changes the rules about the use and disclosure of credit information about serious threats to reflect a recent Privacy Act amendment.

The amendment came into force on 30 June 2013. View:

The amendment was notified as part of Amendment No 7 but was delayed due to the timing of the Privacy Amendment Act 2013.

 

Credit Reporting Privacy Code Amendment No. 7

The Privacy Commissioner has issued Amendment No 7 to the Credit Reporting Privacy Code 2004.

The amendment:

  1. permits credit reporters to disclose credit information to credit providers and credit insurers for the purpose of identity verification under the Anti-Money Laundering and Countering Financing of Terrorism Act 2009 ("AML/CFT Act");
  2. continues for a further four years the obligation on credit providers to notify existing customers if they intend to share credit account information with credit reporters; and
  3. corrects an error in the summary of rights.

The amendment came into force on 1 April 2013, with one clause coming into force on 29 March 2013 and two others coming into force on 30 June 2013.

View:
information paper
media release 

List of amendments:

 

Credit Reporting Privacy Code review: